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The Fifth Plate - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:39 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Steven Gethers, (Screenwriter) ; William Post, Jr, (cast) ; Eugenia Rawls, (cast) ; Anne Pearson, (cast) ; Ann Dere, (cast) ; Marianne Bates, (cast) ; Dr. James Doty, (Moderator)
The Wilson Family has a domestic-housekeeper. Because the family feels that she, Laura, is a member of the family, she regularly ate with them. When the daughter, Judy wants to bring a school friend home, she requests that Laura not eat with the family. Mrs. Wilson suggests that Judy speak to her friend Helen about the issue. Laura, now feeling uneasy about the situation decides not to eat at their dinner table. The Wilson's realize that subtle outside pressures have changed a family relationship. They wonder how children can be taught values which will withstand outside forces. Theme: Outside influences on the home. The thirteenth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Social desirability; Social status; Status seeking; Television programs
ID: TB-13-plate

A Portrait of Hector - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:39 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Irving Gaynor Nieman, (Screenwriter) ; Howard Morris, (cast) ; Frances Sternhagen, (cast) ; Narrated by: Jonathan Harris, (cast) ; Rev. Jameson Jones, (Moderator)
The story is a humorous fantasy dealing with our preoccupation with security. It is done chiefly with voice-over narration in rhyme with pantomime action against a stylized art backdrop. Hector McQuarry from birth to his hundredth birthday is in search of security. At the ago of twelve, Hector sees a sign "Gauranteed Safety for 100 Years" and proceeds to try to acquire this security - pills for health, insurance against all kinds of eventualities, and finally, insurance for the next world. But through it all Hector has not known a peaceful moment. Something went wrong. What was it? This is the question the story leaves with us. Theme: The real meaning of security. The twelfth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Assurance (Theology); Personality development; Security (Psychology); Television programs
ID: TB-12-hector

The Volunteer - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:46 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Mayo Simon, (Screenwriter) ; Joanna Roos, (cast) ; Joan Chandler, (cast) ; Richard Kendrick, (cast) ; Hope Sansberry, (cast) ; Barbara Townsend, (cast) ; Gloria Baron, (cast) ; Dr. Dale White, (Moderator)
Ruth Waggoner, receives a letter from the Helen Hope Nursery School, asking for her help. Although it is a form letter, she thinks of it as a personal invitation to use her training as a former school teacher. Upon arrival at the school, she discovers that she is one of a number of volunteers who are to get out a financial appeal mailing. The staff of the school do not have time to listen when she tries to tell them of her real desire to teach. As she works with the other volunteers, her feeling of rejection grows as they hear her words but do not understand their meaning. In the final scene with the director, Mr. Devere, she tries to tell him of her desire to teach, but he assures her that Miss Freeman is the one who will telephone her. As she leaves feeling rejected and unhappy, Mr. Devere realizes that Mrs. Waggoner is the retired teacher he has been trying to reach all day to confer with about a teaching vacancy. Theme: The importance of feeling needed. The eleventh program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Age and employment; Aged volunteers; Aging; Career changes; Problems of the aged; Rejection; Television programs
ID: TB-11-volunteer

The Apple Orchard - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28: 37 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Art Wallace, (Screenwriter) ; Ian Wolfe, (cast) ; Dorothy Peterson, (cast) ; Victor Thorley, (cast) ; Woodrow Parfrey, (cast) ; Ann Williams, (cast) ; Dr. Ross Snyder, (Interviewer) ; Merle Emory, (Interviewer) ; Dr. Maude Jensen, (Interviewee)
Jonathan and Martha have an opportunity to purchase an apple orchard. There is a down payment of $2,000 required. Martha reluctantly offers her treasured diamond brooch to be used for payment. Jonathan cannot give up the idea of owning the orchard and accepts. However, at the lawyer's office he realizes that he cannot sacrifice Martha's brooch. The Harkers realize that life's meaning cannot be found in the possession of a diamond brooch nor an apple orchard. Theme: Discovering the real meaning of life. The tenth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Interpersonal relationships; Personal property; Psychology of personality; Social perception; Television programs
ID: TB-010

The Foul - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:42
John Clayton, (Director) ; Claire Roskam, (Screenwriter) ; Maury Hill, (cast) ; Richard Bright, (cast) ; Joseph Boley, (cast) ; Mary Clinard, (cast) ; Merle Emory, (Interviewer) ; Lisa Sergio, (Interviewer) ; Dr. Hurst Anderson, (Interviewee)
Peter Hogan tells his school counselor, Mr. Callan, that he has been involved in a scuffle on the basketball court. Callan believes that Peter was justifiably provoked and he would speak to the principal in Peter's behalf. Mr. Rivers, the principal, has misgivings, but understands the situation. Later, Mr. Rivers gets a call from the other student's father, a very influential member of the school board. Rivers retreats from his earlier decision, reminds Callan that he does not have tenure, and demands that Callan recommend Peter's expulsion. After his expulsion, Peter asks Callan for a copy of the recommendation only to find that one was never written. Mr. Callan had to fight an internal war of fear that was ignited by an external conflict of social division. Mr. Callan has to chose between his morality or his supervisor, the principal. Theme: Dealing with anxiety and fear. The ninth program of the Talk Back series.
Topics: Job security; Juvenile deliquency; Peer pressure; Social influence; Television programs; Trust (Psychology)
ID: TB-09-foul

The Switch Point - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:43 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Ernest Kinoy, (Screenwriter) ; Harry Bannister, (cast) ; Ford Rainey, (cast) ; Robert Pastene, (cast) ; Anthony Malloy, (cast) ; Hon. John Brademas, (Moderator)
One evening, John Holden, chairman of the Citizens Committee for Better Schools, asks Martin Swayne to be a candidate for the School Board. Martin protests that he has been out of school affairs too long to be a good candidate, but Holden asks him to think it over. The following day, Ralph Peters, chairman of the Economy Bloc, tries to persuade Martin not to run and hints that Martin in his plumbing and heating business will be a sitting duck for mud-slingers. During a luncheon with Swayne, Holden draws attention to Tommy, their waiter, as a special student who is learning to be a short order cook in one of the so-called "frill" courses. In the closing scene Swayne has decided to run but learns from Holden that Frank Hornmeyer, a former school superintendent, will run instead. Holden asks Swayen to accept the less glamorous task of chairing the Ways and Means Committee. Theme: Our responsibility to our community. The eighth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Civic responsibility; Education; Elections; Politics; School elections; Television programs
ID: TB-08-switch

Forget Richards! - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:55 inutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Art Wallace, (Screenwriter) ; Biff McGuire, (cast) ; Frank Schofield, (cast) ; John Gibson, (cast) ; Raymond Bramley, (cast) ; Dr. Robert Moon, (Moderator)
John Parker, responding to a call by the office manager, Mr. Carlisle, meets Frank Richards nonchalantly arriving for work a half-hour late. When his boss berates Parker for not having the inventory complete, Parker asks how he can be expected to have it ready when his assistant comes to work late. During this conversation, the owner, Mr. Whitmore, interrupts, demanding to know who is responsible for the loss of the Hunt Cosmetic account. The cause was traced to Richards. Whitmore demands the Richards be fired immediately. Later Carlisle and Parker find that Carlisle, not Richards, has misplaced the order. Carlisle realizes that he can be fired for the error. He fails to see why Parker should object to Richards taking the blame since he has repeatedly said that Richards is incompetent. Theme: Applying Christain principles to business. The sixth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Business ethics; Ethics; Industrial relations; Television programs; Work environment
ID: TB-06-richards

The Little Ball Bounces - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:41
John Clayton, (Director) ; Irving Gaynor Neiman, (Screenwriter) ; Liam Dunn, (cast) ; Ruth White, (cast) ; John McGovern, (cast) ; Grant Code, (cast) ; Dickie Olson, (cast) ; Rev. Jameson Jones, (Moderator)
Eric Adams has had bad and good breaks, but neither make much sense to him. There was the promotion he deserved but lost; the victory of his Road Improvement Plan resulted in the tearing down of his house; and then the TV contest he won without any effort. Eric wonders what he has done to deserve the bad or good breaks. What can he really count on? Alice, his wife doesn't consider bad breaks as "moments of trial" but just bad breaks. Theme: What place does luck have in our lives? The fourth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Gambling; Human relations; Job security; Television programs; Work ethic
ID: TB-04-ball

A Time for Waiting - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:43 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Joyce Sloan, (Screenwriter) ; Claire Kirby, (cast) ; Eileen Ryan, (cast) ; Nan Martin, (cast) ; Robin Howard, (cast) ; Dr. Evelyn Berger, (Moderator)
Four wives, Ruth, Linda, Karen and Dolores are in Ruth's home for a social evening while their husbands are away on a hunting trip. A telephone call brings news that there has been an accident and that one of the husbands my have been killed. While waiting for further word, the four women reveal varying attitudes toward the possible tragic loss of a loved one. Dolores is full of self-pity and the feeling that God is punishing her; Linda is filled with a sense of guilt over things she should or should not have done in her married life; Ruth reminds Linda of the wonderful years they have had with their husbands; Karen is busy helping others and will not face the thought of losing her husband. Theme: The Christian approach to the problem of suffering. The seventh program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Grief; Hunting - Accidents and injuries; Hysteria; Prayer; Remorse; Television programs
ID: TB-07-waiting

The Appraisal - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:41 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Steven Gethers, (Screenwriter) ; Shepperd Strudwick, (cast) ; Howard Wierum, (cast) ; Maurine Holbert, (cast) ; Charles Taylor, (cast) ; Dr. James Armstrong, (Moderator) ; Merle Emory Lisa Sergio, (Interviewer) ; Dr. James Armstrong, (Interviewee)
The Morse household goods are being appraised by the State Auctioneer, Mr. Walters. From the sixteen-year-old son, Leonard, Mr. Walters learns that an auto accident, for which Leonard was responsible for, is the cause for the Morse's misfortune. At lunch, Mr. Morse, who obviously is brooding over their loss, is unable to finish the table grace. Leonard turns to him, asking what more can he do to make up for th accident. When his father does not answer, Leonard leaves the room, declaring that he will not go with his parents to the new apartment. Mrs. Morse tries to help her husband see that their happiness has never, and does not now, depend upon the possessions they have. She leaves to talk with Leonard. Mr. Walters cynically tells Morse that people turn to prayer in a crisis as they would to a rabbit's foot, as a last resort. Morse asks, "Why not as a first resort? In an era where the American Dream of self-sufficiency plays a vital role in the family dynamic, individuals usually forget what truly matters and focus on the negatives first before realizing the underline positives of the situation. This type of mindset was made evident during the constant struggle of the family as they were being audited, which diminishes the role of prayer and values. The story ends in reconciliation between Morse and his son. Theme: Prayer or our sense of values. The fifth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Children of depressed persons; Depressed persons; Interpersonal relationships; Prayer; Problem families; Television programs
ID: TB-05-appraisal