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The Appraisal - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:41 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Steven Gethers, (Screenwriter) ; Shepperd Strudwick, (cast) ; Howard Wierum, (cast) ; Maurine Holbert, (cast) ; Charles Taylor, (cast) ; Dr. James Armstrong, (Moderator) ; Merle Emory Lisa Sergio, (Interviewer) ; Dr. James Armstrong, (Interviewee)
The Morse household goods are being appraised by the State Auctioneer, Mr. Walters. From the sixteen-year-old son, Leonard, Mr. Walters learns that an auto accident, for which Leonard was responsible for, is the cause for the Morse's misfortune. At lunch, Mr. Morse, who obviously is brooding over their loss, is unable to finish the table grace. Leonard turns to him, asking what more can he do to make up for th accident. When his father does not answer, Leonard leaves the room, declaring that he will not go with his parents to the new apartment. Mrs. Morse tries to help her husband see that their happiness has never, and does not now, depend upon the possessions they have. She leaves to talk with Leonard. Mr. Walters cynically tells Morse that people turn to prayer in a crisis as they would to a rabbit's foot, as a last resort. Morse asks, "Why not as a first resort? In an era where the American Dream of self-sufficiency plays a vital role in the family dynamic, individuals usually forget what truly matters and focus on the negatives first before realizing the underline positives of the situation. This type of mindset was made evident during the constant struggle of the family as they were being audited, which diminishes the role of prayer and values. The story ends in reconciliation between Morse and his son. Theme: Prayer or our sense of values. The fifth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Children of depressed persons; Depressed persons; Interpersonal relationships; Prayer; Problem families; Television programs
ID: TB-05-appraisal

The Foul - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:42
John Clayton, (Director) ; Claire Roskam, (Screenwriter) ; Maury Hill, (cast) ; Richard Bright, (cast) ; Joseph Boley, (cast) ; Mary Clinard, (cast) ; Merle Emory, (Interviewer) ; Lisa Sergio, (Interviewer) ; Dr. Hurst Anderson, (Interviewee)
Peter Hogan tells his school counselor, Mr. Callan, that he has been involved in a scuffle on the basketball court. Callan believes that Peter was justifiably provoked and he would speak to the principal in Peter's behalf. Mr. Rivers, the principal, has misgivings, but understands the situation. Later, Mr. Rivers gets a call from the other student's father, a very influential member of the school board. Rivers retreats from his earlier decision, reminds Callan that he does not have tenure, and demands that Callan recommend Peter's expulsion. After his expulsion, Peter asks Callan for a copy of the recommendation only to find that one was never written. Mr. Callan had to fight an internal war of fear that was ignited by an external conflict of social division. Mr. Callan has to chose between his morality or his supervisor, the principal. Theme: Dealing with anxiety and fear. The ninth program of the Talk Back series.
Topics: Job security; Juvenile deliquency; Peer pressure; Social influence; Television programs; Trust (Psychology)
ID: TB-09-foul