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Country of Islam - Missions Series


Date:1957
Length: 16m
Gunther V. Fritsch, (Director)
Description taken from Audio-Visual Research Guide (published nine editions, 1949-1972) of the National Council of Churches. Through the eyes of a twelve-year old Muslim boy, the film interprets life in Morocco. Mustafa leaves his home village to seek an education in the city and his journey is full of new and interesting experiences. The efforts of the country to raise its people's living standards are set against backgrounds of Islamic culture, economic problems, and lack of educational programs at present. Excellent photography and scripting merit a highly recommended as an instructional material with junior highs through adults. The informational content is shared with appealing interest, and the film contributes to understanding of the culture involved as well as the role of Islam in that culture. The problems of underdeveloped areas and/or new countries are shown clearly in this fine example of a "secular" production with real relevance to missionary studies.
Topics: Africa; Missions; Morocco; Moving image
ID: MS-004

Congo Journey - Missions Series


Date:1958
Length: 28m
Lloyd Young, (producer) ; Douglas Cox, (Director) ; H. Kenn Carmichael, (Screenwriter) ; Verne Smith (Narrator), (cast) ; Jules Padilla (Editorial), (cast)
Description taken from Audio-Visual Research Guide (published nine editions, 1949-1972) of the National Council of Churches. A personal guide takes viewers on a tour of Methodist mission activity in the Belgian Congo. Beginning in rural areas with glimpses of daily life, customs, and religious rites, the film moves on to cities and their contemporary scenes of people and places. When focusing on Christianity's impact upon the country, the film documents the increasing role played by indigenous clergy and lay leadership, and especially its role in helping rural Congolese adjust to city life as they move in search of the benefits of industrialization. Challenging without being particularly moving, the material could be useful with others than Methodists. As is almost expected in a half-hour film, only some of the pertinent problems and accomplishments are covered but those that are receive generally adequate attention. Some may feel the approach is too general; others will welcome the absence of statistics and an attempt at probing beneath them. As implied above, the various Methodist identifications are not excessive or distracting; in truth, the note of urgency sounded on behalf of this entire continent is most valid for all Christians. The film is recommended for instruction and promotion with juniors through adults.
Topics: Africa; Congo; Education, secondary; Missions; Moving image
ID: MS-003

Christ Comes to Nigeria - Missions Series


Date:1959
Length: 28m
Alexander B. Ferguson, (producer) ; Ray Garner, (Director) ; Jarvis Couillard, (Screenwriter)
Description taken from Audio-Visual Research Guide (published nine editions, 1949-1972) of the National Council of Churches Through the eyes of a missionary doctor, we see the work of the church in upper Nigeria. A native teacher and a native preacher help him to carry on the work of the mission, as together they try to answer the need for more medical and other help. Recommended for instruction and discussion with senior highs through adults, the film presents a clear picture of the needs of a typical mission station in Africa and the ways in which one small group of Christian workers are answering them. The technical qualities are good. These is very little denominational emphasis, so the film would be useful to all churches for missionary education.
Topics: Africa; Medical missions; Missions; Moving image; Nigeria; Video
ID: MS-002

A Revolution Waiting to Happen - Night Call
(click on title above to listen to program. )

Date:1968-11-25
Length: 57:55 minutes:seconds
Del Shields, (Host) ; Winton Nagen, (Guest)
Winston Nagan (1940- ) was just 28 years old and teaching at Virginia Polytechnic Institute at the time of this program. He appeared on Night Call to talk about the Apartheid system then in effect in South Africa. Nagan was born in South Africa and educated at the University of Fort Hare. At that time, the Apartheid authorities were constructing the foundations of a police state. Nagan had been a student leader challenging apartheid authoritarianism and organizing legal defenses for political prisoners. He left South Africa for exile in 1964 and continued his legal studies at Oxford University, receiving a B.A. and an M.A. He earned his LL.M. and M.C.L. at Duke University and his J.S.D. at Yale. Callers compared the U.S. to South Africa and asked whether the unrest in the U.S. might also be seen in South Africa. Nagan said there were many White students in South Africa who were liberal, pluralistic, and opposed Apartheid, but didn't tend to be revolutionary. He said there were also several organizations in the country that were actively opposed to racism, but no political party opposed the current system. Nagan said there was also some effort by other African nations to encourage more equality in South Africa. Nagan is now well-known for his work in international law and human rights. He served as acting justice on the High Court of the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa in 2006. The Apartheid system in South Africa was dismantled in the early 1990's.
Topics: Apartheid; Civil rights; Race relations; Radio programs; South Africa
ID: NC0131

Biafra and the Civil War in Nigeria - Night Call
(click on title above to listen to program. )

Date:1968-12-04
Length: 58:53 minutes:seconds
Del Shields, (Host) ; Onyema Megwa, (Guest)
Onyema Megwa was a member of the Igbo tribe in Western Nigeria. She was also a student at the John Marshall School of Law in Chicago. In May 1967, the people of Western Nigeria succeeded from the country and named the area the Republic of Biafra. The inhabitants, primarily the Igbo, led the secession due to economic, ethnic, cultural, and religious tensions among the various peoples of Nigeria. The secession of the Biafran region was the primary cause of the Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War. At the time of this program, some sources claimed famine in the region was killing about 20,000 people every day, with an estimate of 700,000 to die just in the month of December. Callers were mostly or entirely Africans, opposed to secessionist nation of Biafra. One caller was a proponent of one-Africa and was opposed to any divisions on the continent. Another caller accused Biafrans of being the "Uncle Toms" of Africa, receiving support from South Africa and Israel. Yet another disputed the history of the conflict.
Topics: Africa; Biafra; Radio program; World hunger
ID: NC0137

Healing of M'Vondo (Reel II) - Missions Series


Date:Undated
Length: 12m

Description taken from Audio-Visual Research Guide (published nine editions, 1949-1972) of the National Council of Churches. M'Vondo, a boy in the Congo, discovers one day that he has leprosy. He is shunned by all his friends and feels very lonesome and miserable. His father takes him to the mission leper settlement in Elat, where he is received very cordially by the other lepers, especially by a kindly woman who mothers him. He goes to school and church, helps in the workshops. He receives treatment which results in his cure after three years. He is dismissed with a touching farewell service on the part of the remaining lepers, and joyfully returns home. A fine story simply and effectively presented. Well staged and acted by amateurs in Africa with authentic setting and background. Photography generally good, color sometimes uneven, shadows too dark. Titles on scenery background. Pace and action is slow, but just right for audiences not used to the Hollywood pace of motion pictures. Recommended for missionary education, instruction and promotion of missions. Of special interest in showing what medical missions are doing, and for general evangelistic purposes.
Topics: Africa; Congo; Medical missions; Missions; Moving image
ID: MS-008

Healing of M'Vondo (Reel I) - Missions Series


Date:Undated
Length: 11m

Description taken from Audio-Visual Research Guide (published nine editions, 1949-1972) of the National Council of Churches. M'Vondo, a boy in the Congo, discovers one day that he has leprosy. He is shunned by all his friends and feels very lonesome and miserable. His father takes him to the mission leper settlement in Elat, where he is received very cordially by the other lepers, especially by a kindly woman who mothers him. He goes to school and church, helps in the workshops. He receives treatment which results in his cure after three years. He is dismissed with a touching farewell service on the part of the remaining lepers, and joyfully returns home. A fine story simply and effectively presented. Well staged and acted by amateurs in Africa with authentic setting and background. Photography generally good, color sometimes uneven, shadows too dark. Titles on scenery background. Pace and action is slow, but just right for audiences not used to the Hollywood pace of motion pictures. Recommended for missionary education, instruction and promotion of missions. Of special interest in showing what medical missions are doing, and for general evangelistic purposes.
Topics: Africa; Congo; Medical missions; Missions; Moving image
ID: MS-007