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How Does the Negro Feel about Viet Nam? - Night Call
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Date:1965-11-22
Length: 59:01
Russ Gibb, (Host) ; James M. Lawson, (Guest)
The Rev. James M. Lawson, Jr. is the guest. In 1965, Lawson was a Methodist pastor in Memphis TN. He had been a civil rights leader since his student days at Vanderbilt University.
Topics: Race relations; Radio program; Vietnam
ID: DA-1342

Is Viet Nam Necessary? - Night Call
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Date:1965-11-23
Length: 59:05
Russ Gibb, (Host) ; Andy Borg, (Guest)
Commander Andy Borg was the Commander-in-Chief of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. He had just returned from a tour of Viet Nam to talk with the troops. He served as a judge advocate in the military, and was a lawyer in Wisconsin. He spoke from his home in Superior, Wisconsin.
Topics: International relations; Radio program; Vietnam
ID: DA-1347

What is the War Doing to the People of Vietnam? - Night Call
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Date:1965-11-30
Length: 58:42
Russ Gibb, (Host) ; Senator Daniel Brewster, (Guest)
Daniel Brewster was a Democratic senator of Maryland. He had just returned from a visit to Viet Nam and was speaking from Washington DC.
Topics: Radio program; Vietnam
ID: DA-1415

Can the Vietnamese Ever Govern Themselves? - Night Call
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Date:1965-12-07
Length: 58:41
Russ Gibb, (Host) ; James D. Keys, (Guest)
The guest is James D. Keys, from Washington DC. Keys was from the Agency for International Development. He had just spend a year as a public administration advisor in Viet Nam, training members of the South Vietnamese government.
Topics: International relations; Radio program; Vietnam
ID: DA-1419

Which Way in Vietnam? - Night Call
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Date:1965-12-14
Length: 58:50
Russ Gibb, (Host) ; Sanford Gottlieb, (Guest)
The guest, Sanford Gottlieb, political action director of the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy. Gottlieb spoke from his home in Maryland.
Topics: Radio program; Vietnam
ID: DA-1508

How I Look at the World - Night Call
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Date:1965-12-28
Length: 58:40
Russ Gibb, (Host) ; Barry Bresanz, (Guest)
The guest, Barry Bresanz, was a 17-year-old 12th grader in Detroit, Michigan. He had won a writing award, travelled in 30 countries, and was expelled from high school for wearing a black arm band mourning the dead in Vietnam.
Topics: Education, secondary; Freedom of speech; Radio program; Vietnam
ID: DA-1516

Religious Obedience and Civil Disobedience - Night Call
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Date:1968-06-10
Length: 40:44 minutes:seconds
Del Shields, (Host) ; Dean Kelly, (Guest)
The guest, the Rev. Dean Kelly, was Director for Civil and Religious Liberty for the National Council of Churches. The focus is on opposition to the Vietnam War, and on individual conscience and understanding of faith. Other issues include: Christian pacifism, the difference between civil disobedience and illegal resistance, and the mandatory draft. The beginning of the program (about 18 minutes) was not recorded, and on the back of the tape box it says, "First Section Missing."
Topics: Civil disobedience; Radio program; Vietnam war
ID: NC0023

What Are We Doing in Vietnam? - Night Call
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Date:1968-07-08
Length: 59:02 minutes:seconds
Del Shields, (Host) ; Stephen Ledogar, (Guest)
Program 1 of 5 on Vietnam - this program represents the government's official position. The guest, Stephen Joseph Ledogar (1929-2010,) was with the Vietnam Working Group of the U.S. State Department. Ledogar continued to be a Foreign Service officer for 38 years and ambassador to the three arms control negotiations during the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administrations. He was an architect of agreements that limited conventional, chemical and nuclear weapons. Callers ask about the legitimacy of the war, whether the South Vietnamese agree with the National Liberation Front, who invited the U.S. into Vietnam, why not let them fight their own war, whether the President has a right to unilaterally engage the military, the cost of the war, disparity of information about the war, and use of Agent Orange.
Topics: Radio program; Vietnam
ID: NC0040

The Deaf and Dumb American - Night Call
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Date:1968-07-09
Length: 27:20 minutes:seconds
Del Shields, (Host) ; William Lederer, (Guest)
Program 2 of 5 on Vietnam - representing opposition to American approaches to Vietnam. (Recording starts half-way through the program.) William Julius Lederer, Jr. (1912-2009) was American author. He was a U.S. Naval Academy graduate in 1936 and a Navy public information officer. His 1958 best selling book, "The Ugly American," sought to demonstrate their belief that American officials and civilians could make a substantial difference in Southeast Asian politics if they were willing to learn local languages, follow local customs and employ regional military tactics. In "A Nation of Sheep," Lederer identified intelligence failures in Asia. Callers question his knowledge, want to know how to get information to those in power, whether "body counts" are accurate, what the Geneva Convention says about re-uniting Vietnam, and how criticism of American policy can be really American.
Topics: Politics; Radio program; Vietnam
ID: NC0041

Vietnam: Hawks-eye View - Night Call
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Date:1968-07-10
Length: 59:07 minutes:seconds
F. Edward Hebert, (Guest)
Program 3 of 5 on Vietnam - representing the "hawk's-eye" view. Congressman F. Edward Hebert (Felix Edward Hebert, 1901-1979,) represented the New Orleans-based 1st Congressional District as a Democrat from 1941 until his retirement in 1977. At the time of this program, he served on the House Armed Services Committee. He disagreed with the way the war was being conducted, and thought it should be fought fully and fought to win. He feels demonstrations against the war are treasonous and are communist-instigated, and that Stokely Carmichael and Martin Luther King, Jr. should have been prosecuted for speaking out against the war. Hebert felt TV news was one of America's greatest enemies, and that all newspapers were liberal. Callers were interested in why the war costs so much, how many American had been injured, whether we had too few troops, if the Reserves are not prepared, if we're getting accurate information on battle results, what we want to accomplish in Vietnam, and the possibility of a volunteer Army.
Topics: Politics; Radio program; Vietnam
ID: NC0042