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The Appraisal - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:41 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Steven Gethers, (Screenwriter) ; Shepperd Strudwick, (cast) ; Howard Wierum, (cast) ; Maurine Holbert, (cast) ; Charles Taylor, (cast) ; Dr. James Armstrong, (Moderator) ; Merle Emory Lisa Sergio, (Interviewer) ; Dr. James Armstrong, (Interviewee)
The Morse household goods are being appraised by the State Auctioneer, Mr. Walters. From the sixteen-year-old son, Leonard, Mr. Walters learns that an auto accident, for which Leonard was responsible for, is the cause for the Morse's misfortune. At lunch, Mr. Morse, who obviously is brooding over their loss, is unable to finish the table grace. Leonard turns to him, asking what more can he do to make up for th accident. When his father does not answer, Leonard leaves the room, declaring that he will not go with his parents to the new apartment. Mrs. Morse tries to help her husband see that their happiness has never, and does not now, depend upon the possessions they have. She leaves to talk with Leonard. Mr. Walters cynically tells Morse that people turn to prayer in a crisis as they would to a rabbit's foot, as a last resort. Morse asks, "Why not as a first resort? In an era where the American Dream of self-sufficiency plays a vital role in the family dynamic, individuals usually forget what truly matters and focus on the negatives first before realizing the underline positives of the situation. This type of mindset was made evident during the constant struggle of the family as they were being audited, which diminishes the role of prayer and values. The story ends in reconciliation between Morse and his son. Theme: Prayer or our sense of values. The fifth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Children of depressed persons; Depressed persons; Interpersonal relationships; Prayer; Problem families; Television programs
ID: TB-05-appraisal

Pressure - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 23:46 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Joyce Sloan, (Screenwriter) ; Jeffrey Lynn, (cast) ; Nancy Coleman, (cast) ; Judson Rees, (cast) ; Kimetha Laurie, (cast) ; Harry Stanton, (cast) ; James Reese, (cast) ; Dr. James Doty, (Moderator)
Sam Douglas, an advertising man in his early forties, has promised the car to Bud, his 16-year-old son, for a special date. Sam discovers at the end of the working day that his company has promised a piece of work in less than normal time. An unexpected meeting with the client causes him to be late in reaching home. He tries to telephone, but Pat, the 13-year-old daughter, keeps the line busy. Bud gets more and more upset as the date-time approaches. When Sam arrives home, the pressures build into a heated climax. Bud in his hurry grinds the gears of the car; Sam refuses to let Bud take the car and put him in a taxi. Helen (Mrs. Douglas) gets mad at Sam and at Pat, who is gossiping to a friend on the telephone; everyone is unhappy. Helen, in tears asks, "What has come over us?" Theme: The pressures of modern life. The first program of the Talk Back television series.
Topics: Family life; Human relations; Interpersonal relationships; Television programs; Work environment
ID: TB-01-pressure

The Secret - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:48 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Alvin Boretz, (Screenwriter) ; Ed Peck, (cast) ; Jane Lloyd-Jones, (cast) ; Crahan Denton, (cast) ; Matt Crowley, (cast) ; Richard Dixon, (cast) ; Pat Haggard, (cast) ; Dr. Dale White, (Moderator)
Ralph and Edith Miller say goodbye to their daughter as she boards the train for college. Edith expesses a hope that they will be able to keep Judy in college. Ralph is confident because he has devised a way to re-align his machine at the shop to speed up production, which he feels sure will get him the foreman's job. At work he secretly accomplishes the re-aligning job and the production out-put increases. But the inceased speed causes too much strain and, in the accident that follows, Fred his assistant, loses three fingers and a thumb. When Ralph returns home, he wants to tell his wife, but she misunderstands and he doesn't get the confession out. The next day the boss questions him, but he still doesn't reveal his part in the accident. Ralph breaks under the sense of guilt and spends an afternoon wandering about. When he finally arrives home, Edith questions him, saying that something is wrong. She presses him, but Ralph flares up. Edith tells him she wants to help, but cannot if he will not let her. Since the incident occurred, Ralph has been ashamed of what took place, however, he internally vowed to himself to keep the secret, slowly driving him paranoid. The guilt was eating him alive, his lack of communication to Edith, his boss, and Fred causes him to put himself on a mental island where anxiety, guilt, and shame surrounds him. Theme: Guilt and our need for forgiveness. The second program of the Talk Back television series.
Topics: Industrial relations; Interpersonal relationships; Television programs; Trust (Psychology)
ID: TB-02-secret

The Apple Orchard - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28: 37 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Art Wallace, (Screenwriter) ; Ian Wolfe, (cast) ; Dorothy Peterson, (cast) ; Victor Thorley, (cast) ; Woodrow Parfrey, (cast) ; Ann Williams, (cast) ; Dr. Ross Snyder, (Interviewer) ; Merle Emory, (Interviewer) ; Dr. Maude Jensen, (Interviewee)
Jonathan and Martha have an opportunity to purchase an apple orchard. There is a down payment of $2,000 required. Martha reluctantly offers her treasured diamond brooch to be used for payment. Jonathan cannot give up the idea of owning the orchard and accepts. However, at the lawyer's office he realizes that he cannot sacrifice Martha's brooch. The Harkers realize that life's meaning cannot be found in the possession of a diamond brooch nor an apple orchard. Theme: Discovering the real meaning of life. The tenth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Interpersonal relationships; Personal property; Psychology of personality; Social perception; Television programs
ID: TB-010

The Greatest Ever - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1959
Length: 28 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; George Bellak, (Screenwriter) ; Perry Fiske, (cast) ; Crahan Denton, (cast) ; Katie Feist, (cast) ; Joseph Leon, (cast) ; John McGovern, (cast) ; Mrs. Henry Cannon (Minnie Pearl), (Moderator)
Johnny Keyes, a top TV comic, has the idea for a benefit telethon for orphan kids who need medical treatment. His warmhearted gesture soon develops into an all-out effort by him to make HIS telethon "the greatest ever." Those working with him begin to get quite fed up. Finally he realizes that what he was doing in the name of charity was subconsciously a selfish drive to make himself top man on TV. Theme: Understanding humility. The fifteenth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Egoism; Human relations; Interpersonal relationships; Television programs
ID: TB-15-greatest

A Question of Repairs - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1959
Length: 28 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Clair Roskam, (Screenwriter) ; Liam Dunn, (cast) ; Haywood Broun, Jr., (cast) ; Eugenie Baird, (cast) ; Jane Lloyd-Jones, (cast) ; Luke Halpin, (cast) ; Joey Renda, (cast) ; Rev. Ernest Dixon, (Moderator)
This drama is a half fantasy that didn't really happen, but might happen anywhere. A school ground battle between Lewie Power and Francis Williams, the eight year old sons of business competitors ends by Lewie throwing stones through the windows of the Willimas home. The fathers undertake to show the sons how men settle their differences. While loudly talking the language of understanding, the actions of the men lead to deeper misunderstanding. In the many conversations that ensue neither man really hears what the other says. During the action we see Lewie and Francis come closer and closer together in friendship while the tension between Powers and Williams builds to a climax, as Mr. Williams at night stealthily throws a rock through the window of the Powers home! Theme: Finding a basis for understanding and getting along with others. The sixteenth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Citizenship; Competition; Interpersonal relationships; Pride and vanity; Self-interest; Television programs
ID: TB-16-repairs

The Brothers - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1959
Length: 28 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Rose Schiller, (Screenwriter) ; Betty Ebert, (cast) ; Anne Pearson, (cast) ; Gene Peterson, (cast) ; Jud Taylor, (cast) ; Merle Emory, (Interviewer) ; Lisa Sergio, (Interviewer) ; Dr. James Armstrong, (Interviewee)
Harry and Jack Barker, brothers and business partners, find that disagreements frequently arise between them. Jack, the younger, feels that he isn't allowed to help make an important decision in the business so he blows up. Both brothers want to make up the quarrel but neither knows exactly how to start. Consequently, each misinterprets the other's intentions and the day ends with a halfhearted attempt which satisfies neither. The situation is carried over into both homes that evening with both wives wishing to help their husbands yet not knowing the correct approach. Jack and Harry realize that forgiveness and making up must start somewhere with someone, but where does forgiveness begin? The eighteenth program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Forgiveness; Human relations; Interpersonal relationships; Pride and vanity; Television programs
ID: TB-18-brothers