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The Secret - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:48 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Alvin Boretz, (Screenwriter) ; Ed Peck, (cast) ; Jane Lloyd-Jones, (cast) ; Crahan Denton, (cast) ; Matt Crowley, (cast) ; Richard Dixon, (cast) ; Pat Haggard, (cast) ; Dr. Dale White, (Moderator)
Ralph and Edith Miller say goodbye to their daughter as she boards the train for college. Edith expesses a hope that they will be able to keep Judy in college. Ralph is confident because he has devised a way to re-align his machine at the shop to speed up production, which he feels sure will get him the foreman's job. At work he secretly accomplishes the re-aligning job and the production out-put increases. But the inceased speed causes too much strain and, in the accident that follows, Fred his assistant, loses three fingers and a thumb. When Ralph returns home, he wants to tell his wife, but she misunderstands and he doesn't get the confession out. The next day the boss questions him, but he still doesn't reveal his part in the accident. Ralph breaks under the sense of guilt and spends an afternoon wandering about. When he finally arrives home, Edith questions him, saying that something is wrong. She presses him, but Ralph flares up. Edith tells him she wants to help, but cannot if he will not let her. Since the incident occurred, Ralph has been ashamed of what took place, however, he internally vowed to himself to keep the secret, slowly driving him paranoid. The guilt was eating him alive, his lack of communication to Edith, his boss, and Fred causes him to put himself on a mental island where anxiety, guilt, and shame surrounds him. Theme: Guilt and our need for forgiveness. The second program of the Talk Back television series.
Topics: Industrial relations; Interpersonal relationships; Television programs; Trust (Psychology)
ID: TB-02-secret

The Foul - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1958
Length: 28:42
John Clayton, (Director) ; Claire Roskam, (Screenwriter) ; Maury Hill, (cast) ; Richard Bright, (cast) ; Joseph Boley, (cast) ; Mary Clinard, (cast) ; Merle Emory, (Interviewer) ; Lisa Sergio, (Interviewer) ; Dr. Hurst Anderson, (Interviewee)
Peter Hogan tells his school counselor, Mr. Callan, that he has been involved in a scuffle on the basketball court. Callan believes that Peter was justifiably provoked and he would speak to the principal in Peter's behalf. Mr. Rivers, the principal, has misgivings, but understands the situation. Later, Mr. Rivers gets a call from the other student's father, a very influential member of the school board. Rivers retreats from his earlier decision, reminds Callan that he does not have tenure, and demands that Callan recommend Peter's expulsion. After his expulsion, Peter asks Callan for a copy of the recommendation only to find that one was never written. Mr. Callan had to fight an internal war of fear that was ignited by an external conflict of social division. Mr. Callan has to chose between his morality or his supervisor, the principal. Theme: Dealing with anxiety and fear. The ninth program of the Talk Back series.
Topics: Job security; Juvenile deliquency; Peer pressure; Social influence; Television programs; Trust (Psychology)
ID: TB-09-foul

The Contract - Talk Back Television Series


Date:1959
Length: 28 minutes
John Clayton, (Director) ; Howard Rodman, (Screenwriter) ; Clarice Blackburn, (cast) ; Parker McCormick, (cast) ; Hiram Sherman, (cast) ; Archie Smith, (cast) ; Hon. John Brademas, (Moderator)
A gentleman's agreement between Paul Watt and Harvey Hardie develops in a tedious legal contract that breeds mutual suspicion and mistrust. Paul has a lake-front house and has agreed that Harvey, his neigbor, can cross onto his property to get to the lake. When they decide to put the agreement in writing Paul wrote a simple paragraph while Havey's was long and detailed. Paul was so angered that he built a fence around his property. Their friendship is destroyed by feelings of mistrust. Theme: The need for trust. The twenty-first program of the Talk Back TV series.
Topics: Contracts; Human relations; Politics; Property; Television programs; Trust (Psychology)
ID: TB-21-contract